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Laura, Lapiplasty® Patient

Living With Bunion Pain

Should I delay surgery as long as possible?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

 

PAUL DAYTON, DPM: So one of the interesting and very exciting things about the Lapiplasty is that we are able to offer patients a much more reliable and consistent correction, and that means we have really changed the way we approach bunion surgery with patients. We used to tell patients, “put this off as long as you can possibly can,” because we know the two-dimensional break the metatarsal bone procedures or osteotomy procedures do no work well, therefore we would ask patients to put it off as long as possible. And now that we have a reliable way to correct all three planes of the deformity and do that very consistently, we realize that we’re giving patients an advantage by operating before arthritis sets in in the big toe joint, which is one of the things we see when the deformity has been there for a long period of time, and also reducing the adaptation of all of the tissues within the foot. So being able to have a procedure that provides us a reliable platform, we can comfortably offer that to patients at an earlier date.

Do high heels cause bunions?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

 

ROBERT SANTROCK, MD: It’s a common question whether or not high heels cause bunions, and in my belief they do not. They may contribute, that’s for sure, but any shoe contributes to bunions. Most people who have bunions have a propensity for bunions. They were born with the chance of getting a bunion because of deformity in the middle of the foot, so shoewear can contribute because it squeezes the toes together. So the tighter the toe box, or the pointed part of the toe box of the shoe, and the higher the heel, you do have a higher chance of making the bunion worse.

Is there any bunion too extreme to be treated with Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

 

WILLIAM DECARBO, DPM: Any bunion of any size could be treated with 3D Lapiplasty Bunion Correction.


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

 

RYAN FLANIGAN, MD:

The Science Behind 3D Bunion Correction

Why Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction was developed

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

 

PAUL DAYTON, DPM: The Lapiplasty procedure really came out of many years of our dissatisfaction with bunion surgery. We started looking at the anatomic makeup of bunions and trying to figure out what it was about the procedure that led to such a high recurrence rate and really so many problems, and the one thing that is clearly evident with bunion surgery is that there is a high amount of variability. Every surgeon approaches a bunion different, every surgeon really does a different procedure for it, and that amount of variability really is a recipe for less-than-optimal quality. So the genesis of Lapiplasty was to take a complicated procedure that we believe needed to be done in three planes, and provide instrumentation that could make the procedure reproducible, make it reliable, and then offer it to any surgeon that wanted to perform a three-dimensional correction. And the interesting thing about the concept of Lapiplasty is it really isn’t based on what many times we see sold as innovation, which is a new plate or a new screw. This really isn’t about the hardware or the fixation. It’s about a philosophy of fixing the deformity in three dimensions, and from there being able to do it in a very reproducible way to make it good for both the surgeon and for the patient.

What do you mean by 3D Bunion Correction?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

BRET SMITH, DO: In my practice, a lot of my patients started to ask me about, “Well, what’s this three-dimensional or 3D bunion correction?” And it’s really kind of an issue that I think is important to understand so I take a little bit of time and explain this. So if we think about the bunion, what we traditionally thought was that the bunion happened in really just kind one position only, it was sort of a deviation or the bone had moved outward, but what we really understand now is the bone has actually moved outward and turned as well. So it’s just a change in our understanding, just like anything else. You know, you can drive a Pinto from 1970s or you can drive a brand new Lexus. They’re both cars but one’s a whole lot nicer and more refined than the other, and it’s just like anything else. Over time, we start to learn more and more about a problem and we get a better understanding, and that’s exactly what this is. We have taken and elevated our understanding of the bunion problem from being simply the flat earth now to the round earth.

Why do you choose to offer Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction to your patients?

MINDI DAYTON, DPM: We’ve spent an extensive amount of time over the past 12 years researching bunion surgery and bunion outcomes, and we’ve been able to find a procedure and help develop a procedure called the Lapiplasty that really is a game-changer for bunion patients. This procedure provides excellent outcomes with three-dimensional bunion correction and good anatomic restoration with an excellent profile. So it’s exciting for us to have patients walk in the door, have something they are super scared about talking about or the idea of surgery specifically for bunions because they’ve heard so many horror stories from family members, neighbors, many of them even having had surgery for their bunion themselves in the past and had a recurrence. Being able to take the 30 minutes, 45 minutes, an hour, whatever it takes to really explain the procedure, the deformity, why they had the recurrence, and how we can fix the problem for them, and give them an excellent-outcome is so rewarding for us.

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

DANIEL HATCH, DPM: I personally choose Lapiplasty versus other bunion techniques mainly for the deformity correction. This operates at the CORA, the center of rotation angulation apex of the deformity. It also addresses any hypermobility at the base of that first tarsal metatarsal joint. No other bunion procedure can really address those factors with all one type of procedure.

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

BHARAT DESAI, MD


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

JUSTIN DAIGRE, MD


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Thomas Rocchio, DPM


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Daniel Cuttica, DO


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Abdi Raissi, MD

Why do you perform Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction instead of traditional bunionectomies?

JP McALEER, DPM, FACFAS: I believe the Lapiplasty procedure provides my patients with the very best advantage possible. It’s also what I would perform for my family member if they required a bunion correction.

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

MINDI DAYTON, DPM: When a patient is sitting in a chair and we’re able to show them what an anatomic foot looks like, what a traditional bunion procedure looks like, and what a foot after Lapiplasty tridimensional bunion correction looks like, they’re to see the difference. It just makes sense so them. Then when we’re able to talk about the quicker recovery, with the patient being able to ambulate on the foot within several days after the surgery in a boot, back into a shoe typically around six weeks, and really be able to resume most of their normal activities of daily living very quickly, for a patient it’s an easy decision to proceed with having the Lapiplasty Procedure.

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

 

What happens to the metatarsal bone with a traditional osteotomy bunionectomy?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

PAUL DAYTON, DPM: A bunion deformity is not a growth or a bump. It’s actually a deformity where a bone in the foot called the metatarsal, which is a straight bone, is moved out of position, and the interesting thing about bunionectomies that do an osteotomy or break the first metatarsal bone is that they’re taking a bone that is naturally straight and they’re breaking it and angulating it, now making it crooked. And on top of that, the original deformity, which is the deviation of that bone, is left behind, and that is really why bunion surgery has gotten such a bad reputation over the years, and when you look at a typical osteotomy bunion surgery, you don’t have to be a surgeon to look at it and realize that it just doesn’t make sense to make a straight bone crooked and expect that to solve the deformity problem.

Why have I not been offered the Lapiplasty® Procedure before? Is it new?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

ROBERT SANTROCK, MD: Lapiplasty is a new procedure, and basically with modern technology such as new x-ray technology and weight-bearing CT scans, we’ve been able to see much more of the anatomy, and Lapiplasty was developed with that knowledge and allows us to use modern techniques and modern hardware to recreate the surgeries that were described many decades ago. So it’s new to most surgeons, and it is however founded in the long tradition of understanding bunion surgery.

How does Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction compare to minimally-invasive bunion surgery?

JP MCALEER, DPM, FACFAS: I believe that minimally-invasive surgery is just another form of two-dimensional traditional correction. Small incisions may seem attractive but in the end you still have a high chance for reoccurrence1,2. You’re not truly correcting the deformity at the apex. If you do not correct the deformity in all three planes, which minimally-invasive surgery does not do, you will not get a long-lasting permanent correction of the bunion.

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

 

1. Okuda R, et al. JBJS. 2007. 89:2163-72.
2. Jeuken RM, et al. Foot Ankle Int. 2016. 37:687-95.


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

 

BRET SMITH, DO: MIS bunion surgery has become quite popular lately, and I don’t think there’s anything wrong with the idea behind that, but let’s dissect and break that down. What does MIS mean? Well, minimally-invasive surgery. For me, Lapiplasty is a minimally-invasive surgery, because I can get a complete correction through a fairly limited incision, whereas the “MIS” techniques that are currently out there on the market really only offer the ability to correct maybe one of the problems that are there as opposed to several of the problems that are there, so have you really served the purpose of why we’re going to correct the complete problem or only partially corrected the problem? So using a slightly smaller incision or these MIS techniques, if I get an incomplete correction and your bunion recurs, have I really done you a service as a patient? Instead, I would rather use a technique that completely corrects the problem through a very limited incision, and gives you a durable outcome and gives you a satisfaction that you’re looking for with recovery from your bunion surgery.

 


PAUL DAYTON, DPM: Minimal-incision surgery is really no different than open surgery when you’re talking about cutting or breaking the metatarsal bone. It’s the same two-dimensional procedure that we know does not work well, and we know has a high incidence of coming back or returning over time1,2. So making a smaller incision doesn’t change the fact that we are still unable to correct the entire deformity.

 

1. Okuda R, et al. JBJS. 2007. 89:2163-72.
2. Jeuken RM, et al. Foot Ankle Int. 2016. 37:687-95.

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

ROBERT SANTROCK, MD: It’s a hot topic today; the minimally-invasive bunion surgery. Minimally-invasive bunion surgery might indicate to you that you have a small surgery. That’s not really true. It just means relatively small incisions. Lapiplasty is still a relatively small incision surgery. We designed Lapiplasty to correct your foot biomechanically. We want your foot to get back to the function that it once had and get rid of the bump. This is not a minimally invasive surgery by any stretch of the imagination. Both surgeries move bones and reposition the foot mechanically. We like to say fix it right the first time. Use Lapiplasty. It’s designed for that function.


DANIEL HATCH, DPM: The Lapiplasty procedure and MIS or minimally-invasive bunion procedures differ greatly. Lapiplasty based upon anatomic deformity correction at the apex of the deformity. This ensures good correction and more of a collinear alignment with the foot. And this is ideal getting the sesamoids properly lined up, which is huge for the patient population. MIS, the minimally-invasive bunion procedure, is done more under a blind technique, granted through a smaller incision, but these incisions heal side to side, not lengthwise. So the length of the incision really doesn’t correlate to the optimal results that Lapiplasty gives you.

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

 

How does Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction compare to traditional Lapidus procedures?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

PAUL DAYTON, DPM: The Lapiplasty procedure is really completely different from what is known as a traditional Lapidus procedure. The traditional Lapidus procedure is a two-dimensional operation that really cannot correct the entire deformity. It also differs greatly in that we have a very unique fixation that allows our patients to get back to activity much sooner. The traditional Lapidus procedure generally involves casting and being off of your foot on crutches for an extended period of time, but with the Lapiplasty procedure we’re able to have patients walking in a walking boot within a few days after surgery.

Will my bunion return after Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction?

ROBERT SANTROCK, MD: It’s a common question to hear about recurrence, which means, can the bunion come back? That’s been one of the big problems with traditional bunion surgeries. The Lapiplasty was designed with the intent to prevent recurrence. *Of course, no surgery has a 100% success rate. Our current published data, which we published in 2019, showed that the recurrence rate for Lapiplasty was only 3% after 13 months1.

 

1. Ray J, et al. Foot Ankle Int. 2019 Aug;40(8):955-960.


 

What are the biggest benefits of Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

BRET SMITH, DO: So for me the biggest benefit for the Lapiplasty 3D Correction is number one, I’m restoring the anatomy of the foot back to what it should be. I’m taking away an unstable joint in the mid-foot, realigning the access to the first ray at all three planes and helping to restore the function of the foot to what it should be naturally versus what we used to do in the past, which was to take a normal bone, cut it, and deform it, which wasn’t restoring the natural anatomy. The other thing that really changed in terms of Lapiplasty for me was the ability to weight bear my patients immediately after surgery in a boot. That was a huge help for my patients and their satisfaction as well as their safety, by having their foot on the ground early.

Will my toe still bend/move after Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Mark Easley, MD


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Daniel Hatch, DPM

How does the Lapiplasty® Mini-Incision approach compare to MIS osteotomies?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

William DeCarbo, DPM

What are the advantages of the Lapiplasty® Mini-Incision System?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Daniel Hatch, DPM

Will the Lapiplasty® Procedure change the length of my toe, post-operatively?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Daniel Hatch, DPM


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Robert Santrock, MD

Will the Lapiplasty® Procedure change the width of my foot, post-operatively?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Robert Santrock, MD

More About The Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction Procedure

Is Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction covered by insurance?

WILLIAM DUKE, DPM: The Lapiplasty procedure is covered by the majority of insurance plans. You will need to work with your provider to determine your level of coverage.

Can I have both feet operated on at one time?

ROBERT SANTROCK, MD: Traditionally bilateral lower extremity surgeries, or surgery on both feet, is a difficult thing to go through. You can imagine if you don’t have any foot to get around and move around on, that’s going to be hard on you and the family that you live with, so I usually recommend patients do one foot at a time. It’s not impossible, so you need to talk to your surgeon. If you’re the right patient, the right candidate, and you have lots of support at home, you perhaps may be able to do Lapiplasty on both feet at the same time because it is a surgery that is compatible with immediate weight-bearing in a boot.


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Abdi Raissi, MD

Can patients who have had a failed bunion surgery receive a Lapiplasty® correction?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

JP MCALEER, DPM, FACFAS: I’ve had experience with multiple patients who have had failed two-dimensional traditional bunion approaches, who have come back with recurrence, and they have had surgery up to ten years ago. And we have successfully implemented the Lapiplasty procedure with its triplane correction, and providing these patients with an excellent clinical outcome.


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

JUSTIN DAIGRE, MD


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Jason Miller, DPM

Can the Lapiplasty® Procedure be performed as an outpatient procedure & how long does it last?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Yes, Lapiplasty® surgeries are performed in an outpatient surgical setting. Typically, the surgery will last just under an hour, meaning you are in and out the same day of surgery. If your doctor is performing any additional procedures at the same time, the surgery may take longer.

 

Dr. Kurt Kinghorn, DPM


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

William Duke, DPM

What is meant by the term “reproducible” as it applies to the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

DANIEL HATCH, DPM: Lapiplasty in my experience is reproducible utilizing precision anatomic cut guides. Before that we would make free-hand cuts, and we’d call it a leap of faith type of osteotomy where it’s not very accurate, or we use the curettage technique that again can lead to unpredictable results.

Do the metal plates limit my mobility?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

WILLIAM DUKE, DPM: Many people are concerned about the potential of fusion of the unstable joint that’s present in your hallux valgus deformity. The truth is you don’t even know that that joint is unstable, and by making it stable through fusion, you will actually feel better with walking and ambulation and exercise. So will the fusion bother you? Absolutely not, it will actually help you.


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

BRET SMITH, DO: It’s an excellent question. The plates themselves do not limit your functionality. The joint that we are actually taking away or fusing is actually an unstable joint and by actually stabilizing that joint and fusing it, we’re actually making the foot more functional that way. And so the plates are designed to actually help the function of the foot by taking away an unstable joint.

What type of metal are the Lapiplasty® implants and screws made from?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

PAUL DAYTON, DPM: The Lapiplasty implants, which are plates and screws, are made from a medical grade titanium, which typically does not cause any problems with patient reactions. There are rare instances where patients are allergic to stainless steel and although instruments and tools that are not implanted may have other metals in place, we find in our practice that it is rare to have any issues with the titanium.

Tell me more about the Lapiplasty® surgery. What should I expect?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

ROBERT SANTROCK, MD: Most typically the Lapiplasty surgery is done as an outpatient, meaning you can go home the same day. Our typical patient would undergo a nerve block, which is a type of anesthesia that numbs you from about the knee down. We also then have the patient go to sleep, but it’s a little bit lighter than our average, general anesthesia. This helps you wake up a little faster. Our recovery typically is going to be about six weeks in a weight-bearing boot. We’re going to send you home with crutches, but you’re likely going to be able to put weight on it within just a few days.

Am I a candidate for Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction if I have diabetes?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

DANIEL HATCH, DPM: Having diabetes alone does not exclude you from having the Lapiplasty procedure. Everybody heals at different rates and times and variabilities. The main thing with having diabetes is being under good control. Seeing your primary care prior to surgery, and making sure your hemoglobin A1Cs are within normal limits is probably one of the more paramount things to do. Also being evaluated by your foot and ankle surgeon to have good circulation and no evidence of neuropathy are key factors as well. But you can successfully have Lapiplasty procedure along with having diabetes as a co-medical condition.

Am I a candidate for Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction if I have other foot issues in addition to my bunion?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

PAUL DAYTON, DPM: Many of our patients in our practice have hammertoes, tailors bunions, and possibly other deformities like a flat foot. And with Lapiplasty we’re able to perform the three-plane correction at the same time that we correct the other deformities.

 


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

JUSTIN DAIGRE, MD

What can I expect in terms of pain and pain management after Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

J.P MCALEER, DPM: Typically following surgery, we provide our patients with long-lasting anesthetic blocks to maximize pain relief that coupled with the use of oral anti-inflammatory medication and oral narcotics, depending upon the patients’ needs.


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

THOMAS C. BOLDRY, DPM

Can any doctor perform the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

WILLIAM DECARBO, DPM: Any surgeon trained in the Lapiplasty technique is eligible to perform this procedure. With that said, there is only one Lapiplasty procedure.

What type of patient is a candidate for the Lapiplasty® Mini-Incision System?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Bret Smith, DO


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

William DeCarbo, DPM

Am I too old for Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Daniel Hatch, DPM

Recovery From Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction

Will I have to wear a cast after the surgery?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

WILLIAM DUKE, DPM: With the Lapiplasty procedure, a cast or the use of a scooter to be non-weight-bearing is not required. You can walk within days after the procedure in a protected fashion in a cast or boot.

How long does it take to recover from a Lapiplasty® Procedure?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

PAUL DAYTON, DPM: An important question about any surgical procedure is how long is the recovery and what can you do during the recovery, and with Lapiplasty one of the great benefits is that people can get back to activity quite quickly. I generally will allow my patients to start walking on the foot that we corrected usually in the first two to three days, and then they have a walking boot that they wear for the first six to eight weeks, and depending on how fast their healing, we start at that point, at that six week point, to transition them usually into a running shoe. With any procedure, and the Lapiplasty is no different, we have to allow enough time for the bone to fully heal so that there’s not any problems, and so generally I will ask my patients not do any high level or high energy activity on their foot until they’re at usually around three months, we’ll let them start doing some light sports activity and other things to get back. But the one important thing is with any surgery, you want to allow an appropriate amount of time for your body to heal so that there’s not any issues or problems.


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

MINDI DAYTON, DPM: The recovery is so much better than previous procedures. Our patients are able to start walking just several days after surgery, and get back into a shoe around six weeks which obviously has a profound impact on their quality of life and overall outcome.


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

JUSTIN, DIAGRE, MD


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

THOMAS C. BOLDRY, MD


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Jason Miller, DPM

How much time will I have to take off work to recover from a Lapiplasty® Procedure?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

JP MCALEER, DPM, FACFAS: Time off from work following this procedure will vary, depending upon what your occupation is. The majority of our patients that are working behind a desk can get back to work within 5 to 14 days, just depending upon how they feel. However, if you are a day laborer or doing any type of work that requires for you to be standing on your feet for prolonged periods of time, we may restrict you and there may be a period of time of anywhere from four to six weeks where you may need to avoid doing those occupational things.


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

THOMAS PIGNETTI, DPM


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Abdi Raissi, MD

Will I be able to wear the shoewear of my choice again?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

WILLIAM DUKE, DPM: Oftentimes we get patients asking question about what kind of shoes can they wear after they have the Lapiplasty procedure. The answer is whatever shoes you were most comfortable in before the procedure, we can certainly get you in afterwards. There are certain shoes that are not podiatrist approved but we can certainly get you back into any shoes that you wear on a normal basis.


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

J.P. MCALEER, DPM: Following Lapiplasty, 3D Bunion Correction, patients are not limited in their shoe choices once they’ve healed and returned to full activity. This means you can wear high heels. Even though that may not be my shoe of choice for you, it is okay to return to fashionable footwear when you feel ready.

Are there any physical limitations after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

PAUL DAYTON, DPM: A question that comes up many times when talking about bunion surgery and also with the Lapiplasty is what activities can a patient do after they’re fully recovered, and there really are no restrictions. Once the bones are healed and the correction is over, then patients can get back to full activity and there really are no restrictions. Our patients are able to run, they’re able to participate in sports, and they’re really able to do all normal daily activities.


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

BHARAT DESAI, MD


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Daniel Cuttica, DO


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Jason Miller, DPM

When can I return to sports / all activities after Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Dr. William DeCarbo, DPM: Most patients can return to all activities at three months status post-Lapiplasty and impact sport at four to six months.


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Dr. Thomas Pignetti, DPM


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Daniel Cuttica, DO

Will I have a scar after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

William DeCarbo, DPM


*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Dr. JP McAleer, DPM, FACFAS: With any typical surgical procedure, incisions are made, scarring does happen. However, we try to minimize scar with our approach to closure and our postoperative bandaging protocol. Typically my patients have a very fine scar. I use a subcuticular stitch underneath the skin, which is absorbable, so you won’t have those traditional railroad tracks crossing the incision lines.


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Dr. Thomas C. Boldry, DPM

How often will I need to return for follow-up after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Dr. Daniel Hatch, DPM: Follow-up depends on your personal physician criteria for post-op care. And this can vary somewhat. The average would be seeing somebody for three to four months post-procedure to make sure you have good wound and osseous healing with that. The normal post-op protocols, like I mentioned, can vary. Usually immediate after surgery for wound changes and dressing changes, and then followed by two, six, and twelve week follow-ups for radiographic studies.

 

Can you tell me more about the walking boot I will need to wear after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Dr. JP McAleer, DPM, FACFAS: Following Lapiplasty, we typically allow patients in my practice to walk the day of surgery. We allow the patients to ambulate in the boot for six weeks, and then we transition them into their tennis shoes. Following that 12-week mark after surgery, we allow patients to wear whatever shoes they’d like. At the four-month mark, we allow our patients to return to high intensity activity. We don’t require the patients to sleep in the boot or wear it 24 hours a day. This allows for patients to perform range of motion exercises at their big toe and ankle joints, and it also allows them to tend to their incisions and perform icing of the area.

When can I drive after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Dr. Bret Smith, DO: So for me, I have two requirements for my patients. One is that they have to be able to put their weight down fully on the ground so that they can push the brake and the emergency, in their post operative shoe, not the boot. I want them in the shoe when they drive, the post-op shoe, not the post-op boot. And they have to be off their narcotic medications if they’re taking any. They have to be off of those. That goes for left or right in my mind. Although obviously if it’s a left-sided surgery, sometimes getting back to driving is a little bit easier than the right side, just because the difference in comfort. But the same requirements I have, they still have to be in their post operative shoe and they still have to put all of their weight down and they have to be off their narcotic medications.

Is physical therapy generally recommended after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Jason Miller, DPM

Should I plan to line up assistance after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Mark Easley, MD


 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Robert Santrock, MD

Can I get back to ANY activity (high-intensity sports) after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Bret Smith, DO

Will I have a scar after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

William DeCarbo, DPM

Will the Lapiplasty® Procedure change the size shoe I wear, post-operatively?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

JP McAleer, DPM

What symptoms/reactions can I expect after the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

 

*Physician is a paid consultant of Treace Medical Concepts, Inc.

Paul Dayton, DPM

Want to Learn More?

Want to Learn More?

Looking for more in-depth information on the Lapiplasty® Procedure? We invite you to download this helpful patient education brochure. Also, please visit our Find A Doctor locator to speak with a Lapiplasty® surgeon to see if Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction is right for you.

Download in English
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Not finding the answer you’re looking for? Contact Us

Take the Short Quiz

Am I a Candidate?

Begin Quiz
Tom, Lapiplasty® Patient
1 of 3

Select the image below that best describes the bunion on your big toe.

A mild bunion is a small but noticeable bump at the base of the big toe and a big toe that starts to lean toward the 2nd toe.
A moderate bunion is a substantial bump at the base of the big toe and a big toe that leans toward the 2nd toe.
A severe bunion is a large bump at the base of the big toe and a big toe crosses over the 2nd toe.
A normal foot does not have a bump at the base of the big toe or a big toe that leans toward the 2nd toe.
Please supply an answer
2 of 3

Select the image(s) below that describe other issues with your feet.

A bunionette (or Tailor’s bunion) is a bump at the base of your little toe. It’s possible that bunionettes can be treated during the same surgery as Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction™.
A hammertoe is an abnormal bend in the middle joint of your toes. It’s possible that hammertoes can be treated during the same surgery as Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction™.
Arthritis occurs when the cartilage at your big toe joint (1st metatarsophalangeal or MTP joint) breaks down, causing pain and stiffness. The Lapiplasty® implants are indicated for MTP fusion, which can be appropriate for advanced big toe arthritis.
Diabetes is a disease that affects how your body uses blood sugar. Diabetic patients with controlled blood sugar levels may still be candidates for Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction™.
None of these issues.
Please supply an answer
3 of 3

Have you had bunion surgery before?

Please supply an answer

What type of insurance do you have?

Please supply an answer

What is the patient’s age?

Please supply an answer

Enter your information to receive your results.

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Thank You!

Your Results Are On Their Way

You may be a candidate for Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction™. Check your inbox for more information.

*The “Am I a Candidate” assessment should only be completed by patients over the age of 18 or by a parent/legal guardian. This assessment is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Only a trained Lapiplasty® doctor can determine if you are an appropriate candidate for Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction™. Please consult with your doctor to determine if Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction™ is right for your specific condition. Lapiplasty® 3D Bunion Correction™ is indicated for patients 12 years of age and older. As with any medical treatment there are risks and recovery takes time. For a complete list of risks, see the Patient Risk Information For Information about how we handle your information please see our Privacy Policy and California Privacy Policy.

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Considering the Lapiplasty® Procedure?

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800-363-4145

The Lapiplasty® Patient Call Center is for patient questions related to our product and procedure only.
As a medical device manufacturer, Treace Medical Concepts, Inc. cannot provide any opinions or other medical advice to patients. For medical advice please contact your doctor.